More than just a doorstop

Fruitcake season is again upon us. Dear husband couldn’t be happier. This is his nectar of the gods, the key to his tolerance of the holidays. He began looking for it at Costco weeks ago and came home jubilant the day he finally found it. Without telling me what he was talking about he started the conversation with, “They make 911 of them every year.” Me: “Uhm, 911 of what?” Him: “Fruitcakes! So I’m not the only one who loves it! They make 911 and they sell out every year!”

He believes there should be more fruitcake in the world. He’s twice suggested to That Takes the Cake that they should make fruitcake cupcakes. They’ve humored him but it’s not looking like it’s going to be part of their business plan anytime soon.

In the meantime our routine is the same every year. I hide the fruitcake. He gets a piece a week. If we didn’t have a rationing plan the darned thing would disappear within a couple of days. Or maybe less. We do the same with my peppermint bark. It’s under lock and key. You’d think a couple of adults could exercise some restraint, wouldn’t you?

Theme Day: Sensual

For today’s Theme Day, “Sensual,” I’ve allowed myself to get a little personal. A young couple, newly engaged. The look. That moment where eyes meet and, soon, lips lock. Sensual doesn’t have to say everything. It can suggest, imply, foretell. This is a photo taken in 1981 by a dear and good friend, Marie, who has been featured before on this blog.

And speaking of sensual…my second nominee for today’s theme. This one is another moment, just before lips move into action. Sensual in an entirely different way.

Click here to see interpretations from other City Daily Photo bloggers around the world.

Rose hips

The wild roses that are so abundant around here have lost their delicate blooms. Now come the rose hips, the seed pods that are left behind. This one caught my eye. Its oval shape and pale, peachy color is different from the round red ones produced by the common Nootka rose (rosa nutkana). It may be a less common baldhip (rosa gymnocarpa). Rose hips are a food source for birds, small animals, deer, and elk. Humans use them too. Click here if you want more information about that.