Fort Worden, located next to Port Townsend in Washington, was established in the late 1890s. Along with Forts Casey and Flagler, its purpose was to prevent hostile fleets from reaching targets such as the Bremerton Naval Yard and the cites of Seattle, Tacoma, and Everett. Construction of the fort began in 1897 and continued in one form or another until the fort was closed in 1953.

The Fort Worden Officer’s Row housing looks onto an open parade ground. The buildings were constructed between 1904 and 1915. To the far left, at the end of the row, is Admiralty Inlet.

Fort Worden, located next to Port Townsend in Washington, was established in the late 1890s. Along with Forts Casey and Flagler, its purpose was to prevent hostile fleets from reaching targets such as the Bremerton Naval Yard and the cites of Seattle, Tacoma, and Everett. Construction of the fort began in 1897 and continued in one form or another until the fort was closed in 1953.

The Fort Worden Officer’s Row housing looks onto an open parade ground. The buildings were constructed between 1904 and 1915. To the far left, at the end of the row, is Admiralty Inlet.

I love any excuse to go to Port Townsend, a neat town with an interesting maritime history that is about a 45 minute drive from Sequim. My boat lover husband often finds reasons that take us to ship’s chandleries or places like Edensaw Woods, a high level danger zone for anyone interested in wood or tools. But I digress. . .

Our latest trip found us exploring Fort Worden State Park which is next door to Port Townsend. The Fort is part of a network of early fortifications that guarded the nautical entrance to Puget Sound.  The park is now used as a conference center with accommodations in historic military housing as well as camping and has a beautiful view of the Admiralty Inlet. I’ll share more views of the Fort Worden area in the next several days.