I’m embarassed to admit that I’ve lived in Sequim two years before I finally darkened the doorstep of the Museum & Arts Center (MAC). Partly, I didn’t know what to expect. And, frankly, I’m accustomed to big museums where I can melt away, be anonymous, and take it in as I wish, mistakenly admiring a random fire alarm if it suits me.

The MAC is small, comfortable, and pleasant. The art above has just been changed out for a juried art show and sale, part of the annual Sequim Irrigation Festival.

There are also history exhibits – human history of the region and a small exhibit on the Manis Mastodon, a fascinating archaeological find near Sequim that recently established human habitation here fully 13,800 years ago. The Manis site was excavated in the late 1970s and one of the first rib bones of the mastodon found at the site revealed a spear point embedded in the bone. CT scans last year confirmed that the point had been finely worked by human hands; DNA tests established human habitation 800 years before the Clovis peoples who had previously been thought to be the earliest inhabitants of North America. Clare Manis Hatler, on whose property the dig took place, doesn’t exaggerate when she says, “I’ve got the oldest bones around.” Several are exhibited at MAC.

I’m embarassed to admit that I’ve lived in Sequim two years before I finally darkened the doorstep of the Museum & Arts Center (MAC). Partly, I didn’t know what to expect. And, frankly, I’m accustomed to big museums where I can melt away, be anonymous, and take it in as I wish, mistakenly admiring a random fire alarm if it suits me.

The MAC is small, comfortable, and pleasant. The art above has just been changed out for a juried art show and sale, part of the annual Sequim Irrigation Festival.

There are also history exhibits – human history of the region and a small exhibit on the Manis Mastodon, a fascinating archaeological find near Sequim that recently established human habitation here fully 13,800 years ago. The Manis site was excavated in the late 1970s and one of the first rib bones of the mastodon found at the site revealed a spear point embedded in the bone. CT scans last year confirmed that the point had been finely worked by human hands; DNA tests established human habitation 800 years before the Clovis peoples who had previously been thought to be the earliest inhabitants of North America. Clare Manis Hatler, on whose property the dig took place, doesn’t exaggerate when she says, “I’ve got the oldest bones around.” Several are exhibited at MAC.

The Jefferson County Courthouse is a standout building atop a hill in Port Townsend. Designed by Seattle architect W. A. Ritchie in the Romanesque style, it was built in 1891 for an estimated cost of $150,000.

Here is a look at some of the detail.

The historic Clallam County Courthouse in Port Angeles is smaller than this but lovely in its own right. I must post it, too.

There we were with our weekend guests, downtown Sequim, and about to go home for dinner. Then I remembered: what about dessert? Okay, maybe I didn’t just “remember.” We were mere steps away from cupcake heaven, That Takes the Cake, and lemon blueberry and carrot cupcakes to go.

The baker was about to put finishing touches on this cake in the kitchen. She graciously brought it out when I asked if I could take a picture. Happy birthday, Katlyn!

“Bakeries” is today’s City Daily Photo Theme Day. Click here to view thumbnails for all participants.

Chord’s favorite pal Jenny Bell came for a visit last weekend. They have the labrador retriever thing for tennis balls. There’s no game like a dog game.

“Jenny’s got the ball. She’s got a clear field to the left. She’s going to go long. . .no, wait. . .! It looks like there’s trouble on the field!”

“Jenny’s lost it! Chord’s down but he’s got the ball! What’s that he’s saying? Bob, can you pick it up from where you’re sitting?

Ed, I think he’s saying ‘Neener, neener, neener!'”

What game?