Whimsy Park

The temporary former location of the Sequim Farmer’s Market has taken on a new life. “Whimsy Park” is something of a popup park that has transformed a previously bare lot on Washington Street. A mural that was incomplete several months ago is now enhancing a space with picnic tables, a small stage, and straw bale seating.

Landscaping has been installed and wood chips soften the look of formerly bare soil. The space is inviting, colorful, and far more welcoming than it previously was.

Patience in a pot

Today is the second and last day of the Dungeness Bonsai Society annual bonsai fest, its 41st. If you’re local and would like to walk through a miniature forest of trees as art, it’s worth a trip to the Sequim Pioneer Park. The Satsuki Azalea above, over 20 years old, is one of the showiest examples of the art.

Bonsai artists confine trees in small pots and manipulate them through pruning and shaping. The effect, over time, is to create a gorgeous miniature tree.

This Japanese garden juniper is from 20 to 25 years old. Its owner began training its growth habits in 1994. This is a discipline of great patience.

There are more than 50 trees on display today, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The park is located at 387 East Washington Street.

Breakfast at the airport

Before we went to the Port Townsend Aero Museum, here and here, we went to the Spruce Goose Cafe nearby. I’d heard the food was good. I’d heard right.

The decor is all about airplanes: posters, models, framed photographs.

It was a nice day and the deck was full. After they finished their meals several diners walked down to the air field, untethered planes and took off. That’s one way to make an exit.

Fancy flights

I’d heard that the Port Townsend Aero Museum was worth a visit. Last week I finally made it there and was delighted that I did. I’m not an aviation enthusiast but this place is exciting, filled with interesting and gorgeous aircraft.

Visitors are surrounded by planes, on the floor of the museum and in virtual flight. About 20 1920s to 1940s vintage aircraft are on display. There are also hundreds of models in display cases.

Everything gleams with love and the museum is a visual delight. The beauty above is a 1937 Staggerwing Beech (Model C-17B, if you really want to know).

The museum is focused on youth mentorship, including job skills training through restoration, maintenance, and operation of the museum’s antique aircraft. Tomorrow I’ll share more of what I saw.

“I can see by your outfit that you are a cowboy…”

Now that we have the Coastal Farm and Ranch store those of us who aren’t farmers or ranchers can indulge in cowboy or cowgirl fantasies. In addition to a big selection of hats there are also plenty of boots.

I haven’t had a pair of western boots in a long time. But these fancy ones are eye candy.

I have so many other things on my shopping list these aren’t going to be anywhere near the top. But it’s fun to look.

Spring adventure

I’ve wanted to go back to the San Juan Islands, arguably one of the most beautiful areas of Washington State, since the first time I visited by ferry decades ago. It was there that I fell in love with Washington.

A while back I heard about a San Juan Island cruise offered by Puget Sound Express in partnership with Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society. The three day birdwatching and wildlife cruise sounded spectacular. From Sequim our voyage was just across the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

The photo above is of the MV Glacier Spirit, the family owned cruiser we traveled on.

Inside was comfortable and warm with snacks, lunch, coffee, and good cheer.

This is a chart of our travels over three days through the San Juans, shown in yellow. Vancouver Island is the large land mass on the upper left; to the far right is northern Washington and the city of Bellingham. The thin pink and red lines show our route as we looked for whales, dolphins, birds, and other sealife through the large and small islands of the San Juan archipelago. I’ll show you what we saw over the coming days.