Art on the town

This is another piece of kinesthetic street art in Port Angeles, part of the city’s “Art on the Town” organized by the Port Angeles Downtown Merchants Association. This one is called “Bernard 2” by Craig Walker of White Salmon, WA, a town in southern Washington on the Columbia River. The top part of this piece rotates in the wind.

Lobby art

On a grey day this striking glass art brightens a corner in the Sequim Civic Center lobby. The piece was commissioned by friends and family in memory of Bobbi Burkett, wife of Sequim’s former City Manager Steve Burkett. The work was designed and constructed by artist Bob Rigg of Seattle Glassblowing Studio.

Fused, fired, and stained

Sequim’s new Civic Center has exhibit space on its ground floor where local artistry is showcased. The latest art in rotation is various forms of glassworks. The fused piece above, “Under the Sea,” is by Marilyn Brock.

“Running Horses,” above, is by Cindy Fager. It features both glass and rock.

This stained glass piece is called “Butterfly Lady” and was created by Millie Harrell.

The butterflies on this piece stand out from the glass, giving it more dimension than typical stained glass.

There are about two dozen pieces in the exhibit which is on view through March 31. It’s worth a visit if you’re in the area.

The whale bone

This unnamed sculpture by Alex Anderson is installed at Valley Creek Estuary Park in Port Angeles. If you’re not familiar with whale physiology it’s styled after a whale vertebrae. The scale of the piece is substantial. It weighs seven tons and is 12 feet tall and four feet thick. It was a $65,000 gift to Port Angeles by an anonymous donor.

Art or energy?

These three wind turbines were installed last September at Waterfront Park in Port Angeles, Sequim’s westerly neighboring town. The first time I saw them I thought they were pretty dramatic sculptures. Which, actually, they may well be. Or not. They may also generate power.

There’s some controversy around these units. City officials thought they could generate power for lighting in the park. But they also wanted art…and nobody’s actually sure how much wind power they may harvest. They’re not rotating for now. Port Angeles is involved in “an inspection-related dispute with the manufacturer.”